ANNUAL MEETING AND FREE EVENT – Diversity in Graphic Novels: Serving Patrons & Building Diverse Collections

Join your BayNet colleagues Friday, May 19 for our Annual Event and Meeting!

Register Now!

This year we’ve planned a unique opportunity for librarians working in any environment to learn about next-level graphic novel collection development, with a special emphasis on building a diverse collection. In this special presentation – led by two veteran graphic novel selectors and general comic book enthusiasts – you will learn about why librarians serving all kinds of audiences are turning to graphic novels, and best practices and procedures to further grow and diversify comic and graphic novel collections. Everyone who works with graphic novels in their library, or wants to learn more about these wildly popular materials, will have something to gain from attending this event.

Program Agenda:
9:00-10:00 am – BayNet Annual Meeting, Refreshments & Networking
10:00-11:00 am – Collection Development
11:00 am-Noon – Author Panel

We’ll begin with a presentation by Jack Baur (Berkeley Public Library) and Amanda Jacobs Foust (Librarian and Consultant), two longtime graphic novel selectors and the co-hosts of the In the Library with a Comic Book podcast. The duo will discuss the history and current direction of representation in comics; share their collection development best practices, and favorite resources; and discuss philosophical approaches to building and curating a diverse graphic novel collection. Jack and Amanda will also share some of their annual annotated Top 10 lists, and allow plenty of time for Q&A.

The second half of the program will feature a special panel of comic book professionals who will share their creative processes and discuss the power of comics as a means of telling diverse stories, and as educational tools. Guests on the panel will be:

Thi Bui – writer/artist of the upcoming graphic novel The Best We Can Do, founding member of Oakland’s International High School
Nidhi Chanani – writer/artist of the upcoming graphic novel Pashmina, illustrator at Everyday Love
Casey Gilly – comic book journalist, consultant, editor, and writer
Justin Hall – Assistant Professor of Comics at CCA, editor of No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics
Mariko Tamaki – Eisner Award-winning writer of This One Summer, current writer on Supergirl: Being Super and Hulk
Raina Telgemeier – Author/Illustrator of Ghosts & Smile

Event details
When: Friday, May 19, 9:00 am-Noon
Where: Koret Auditorium, San Francisco Public Library, 100 Larkin Street (@ Grove)
Registration required

South San Francisco Public Library Presents: Prohibition in San Mateo County

Thursday, May 11, 6:00 p.m.

Prohibition in San Mateo County presented by Carmen Blair, Deputy Director,  San Mateo Historical Society  (Held offsite at Armstrong Brewing CO.)  

In the 1930s, mobster Sam Termini called San Mateo County the most corrupt county in the state.  With rumrunners landing Canadian whiskey on isolated beaches, moonshiners operating in homes and a multitude of speakeasies, the county earned a reputation as one of the “wettest” in the state during Prohibition. Carmen Blair, Deputy Director of the San Mateo County Historical Association, will share Prohibition stories during an illustrated presentation.

Bio: Carmen Blair is the Deputy Director of the San Mateo County Historical Association.  Her responsibilities include: being involved with school programs, public programs for adults and children, as well as overseeing exhibits and publications. She received her B.A. in History from Gustavus Adolphus College and her M.A. in Museum Studies from San Francisco State University.

This event is co-sponsored by the Armstrong Brewing Company.

Connect with the San Mateo Historical Society

Website|Facebook

Connect with Armstrong Brewing Co.

Website|Facebook|Twitter

BART, The Dramatic History of the Bay Area Rapid Transit System presented by Michael C. Healy, BART Historian.

Sunday, May 21, 3:00 p.m.

Presentation and Discussion:  BART,  The Dramatic History of the Bay Area Rapid Transit System

The discussion will be led by Mr. Bart himself the Official Historian, Michael C. Healy, author of the book, BART: The Dramatic History of the Bay Area Rapid Transit System. This fascinating book undertakes the massive task of chronicling  something the Bay Area takes for granted. Did you know that the original BART plan included Marin and San Mateo counties? Healy does a terrific job exploring both the grand plans and the hard realities of building one of the nation’s first multi-county rapid transit systems.

Nicknamed “Mr. BART” by his colleagues, Michael C. Healy was responsible for BART’s media affairs and marketing activities from 1971—about ten months before trains started running—until his retirement in 2004. He wrote for radio and film and was the editor of the Sausalito News before taking a public relations job at the nascent transit agency. He is an alumnus of the University of Southern California.

Connect with Michael C. Healy                                                                                           

Heydey Books|BART

Protecting Cultural Collections: Disaster Prevention, Preparedness, Response & Recovery

Part 1:  ON-LINE WEBINARS – Prevention & Preparedness (archived 2½ hours total)
Part 2:  IN-PERSON WORKSHOP – Response & Recovery

Belmont, CA:  Tuesday, May 23, 2017 – 9:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m. – Notre Dame de Namur University, Gellert Library

The workshop is FREE.  Participation in the in-person workshop requires viewing the archived Part 1 webinars BEFORE attending the Part 2 in-person workshop AND completing the workshop assignments. Any exception requires the permission of the instructor. Link to the webinars will be provided upon registration.

Sponsored by Western States & Territories Preservation Assistance Service (WESTPAS)

Co-Sponsored by California Preservation Program (CPP)

Instructor: Julie A. Page, Co-Coordinator, CPP and WESTPAS

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The “Protecting Cultural Collections” training is presented in a sequence of two archived webinars plus one in-person workshop to produce the following outcomes:

  • Complete a disaster response & collection salvage plan
  • Learn how to train staff to implement your plan effectively
  • Set pre- and post-disaster action priorities for your collections
  • Understand practical decision-making skills needed during an emergency
  • Experience salvage procedures for books, documents, photos & objects

The webinar sessions and the in-person workshop are scheduled to enable participants to prepare short assignments between sessions, resulting in a completed disaster plan. Participating institutions will be invited to join an informal network of WESTPAS trained personnel to provide mutual aid in the event of emergencies involving collections in your region.

Who should attend:    Administrators and staff responsible for emergency preparedness, response and decision-making, in all types of cultural institutions.  By registering for the workshop, the institution commits to supporting the attendee(s) to achieve the workshop’s disaster preparedness goals. When possible, please commit two attendees so they can work together on the disaster preparedness activities.

Cost:    No charge to the institution.  Funding provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the California State Library.  Mileage reimbursement funds are available to staff (paid or volunteer) from California organizations, with annual operating budgets of less than $250,000, for travel in excess of 100 miles round trip to attend the workshop.

Registration:     Pre-registration required. Register online for the IN-PERSON session at: WESTPAS workshop   http://tinyurl.com/ot4kve2

For registration assistance contact: Wendy Cao,  caow@plsinfo.org

For general & content information contact Julie Page  jpage@calpreservation.org

EVENT: 2017 Witkin Symposium: Fred Korematsu Speaks Up

Presented by the Alameda County Law Library | $35-$45

In May 1942, one of the assembly centers for Japanese internment camps was the 1117 Oak Street, next door to what is now the law library. The Korematsu family lived in Oakland and may have reported to this address before being transported to the Tanforan detention facility.

Fred Korematsu challenged the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans when few others did. A new children’s book, Fred Korematsu Speaks Up, explores this civil rights hero’s life and its relevance today. The 19th Annual Witkin Lecture features authors Laura Atkins and Stan Yogi discussing their treatment of Fred’s lifelong fight for justice. They will read excerpts from the book and address the larger historical context, and discuss what people can do today to speak up for justice.

Come experience the power of story to inspire and persuade. Be reminded of the role of attorneys in assuring that “equal justice for all” is not an empty phrase, but a bedrock value nurtured by the efforts and the professional responsibility of attorneys.

Register today!

Date/time:
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 from 11:30 AM to 1:00 PM (PDT)

Location:
Alameda County Training and Education Center
125 12th St #400
Hayward-San Leandro Room
Oakland, CA 94607